Author Kevin R. Kosar releases Moonshine: A Global History

I was fortunate to attend a reception at the Distilled Spirits Council offices the other nightmoonshinehistory for Kevin R. Kosar, vice president of policy at R Street Institute, and his new book Moonshine: A Global History. Despite its close association with Appalachia, the concept of moonshine really is a worldwide phenomenon. Kosar offers some details on his new book:

Despite its reputation as a product of ramshackle stills hidden away in the Appalachian Mountains, moonshine has a long and storied global history. No matter where you go on earth, there is a local bootleg liquor, whether it’s white lightning, chang’aa, or hjemmebrent.

In Moonshine: A Global History (Reaktion Books/University of Chicago Press), Kevin R. Kosar tells the colorful and, at times, blinding history of moonshine, which features a crazy cast of crusading lawmen, clever tinkerers, sly smugglers, ruthless gangsters, pontificating poets, mountain men, beleaguered day-laborers and foolhardy frat boys.


Kosar first surveys all the things we’ve made moonshine from, including grapes, grains, sugar, tree bark, horse milk, and much more. But despite the diversity of its possible ingredients, all moonshine has two characteristics: it is extremely alcoholic, and it is, in most places, illegal. Indeed, the history of DIY distilling is a history of criminality and the human ingenuity that has prevailed out of officials’ sights: from cleverly designed stills to the secret smuggling operations that got the goods to market. Kosar also highlights the dark side: completely unregulated, many moonshines are downright toxic and dangerous to drink.

Kosar explains, “Moonshine exists, and always will. So, governments should minimize the damage it can do by letting folks distill for personal consumption and fostering a competitive, legal drinks market that gives consumers a broad range of professionally made beverages.”

The book is a follow-up to Kosar’s Whiskey: A Global History, released in 2010. Kosar founded AlcoholReviews.com in 1998 and contributed to the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America in 2004. He currently serves as a Senior Fellow at the R Street Institute, a free-market think-tank based in Washington, D.C., where he oversees the organization’s alcoholic beverages policy program.

Moonshine: A Global History is available now through University of Chicago PressAmazonand other retailers.More information about the author, including contact information, is available through his website.

 

 

About Jeff Cioletti

I’m Jeff Cioletti and The Drinkable Globe marries my two greatest passions: fine drink and travel. The search for the former usually drives the latter. I'm the author of The Year of Drinking Adventurously. When I’m not traveling and drinking— aww, hell, who am I kidding, even when I am—I'm editor-at-large of Beverage World magazine and its companion site, beverageworld.com. I’ve been at Beverage World since January 2003. I’ve been interviewed on beverage-related topics for CNN, Fox Business News, CNBC, Beer Sessions Radio, Canada's ROB TV, NPR, BBC World, BBC Radio, The Associated Press, The New York Post, Financial Times, Investors Business Daily, Advertising Age, WCBS-TV and several other media outlets. Beyond the journalism gig, I’m also a filmmaker; I wrote, produced and co-directed the feature film, “Beerituality,” a comedy set in the world of craft beer. The film is available on at http://www.storenvy.com/products/510365-beerituality-dvd and can be streamed and downloaded at amazon.com

Posted on August 3, 2017, in craft spirits, news, spirits, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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