Blog Archives

Shochu revisted

The more acquainted I get with shochu, the more I realize how much more there is to learn about it. It’s such an easy beverage to like, but not such an easy one to know.

Photo: Jeff Cioletti

Photo: Jeff Cioletti

In 2015, I’ve traveled to Japan twice—mostly to the epicenter of shochu production, the southern island of Kyushu—with the express purpose of exploring the elusive spirit that gets a chapter-long shout-out in The Year of Drinking Adventurously (my new book, due out in a little over three weeks—pre-order today).

Back in March I toured several shochu distilleries, dined with their proprietors and made a circle of new friends whose common bond is a passion for the drink. In October, I returned to Kyushu (thanks to the Japan Sake and Shochu Makers Association and Kampai.US mastermind Stephen Lyman) for a bigger, bolder sequel to that spring experience. Read the rest of this entry

The Drinkable Week: Japan through a glass

It’s the first “very special episode” of The Drinkable Week. (Grab the tissues and don’t do drugs, kids.) This week, I’m in Tokyo and in the Kagoshima and Kumamoto Prefectures experiencing shochu, the treasured spirit of the southern island of Kyushu. The itinerary, very generously organized by the Japan Sake & Shochu Makers Association (JSS), included tours of six distilleries and more bars than I can count (and so much amazing food!) Extra special thanks to JSS’s Ken Kajihara and Kampai.US’s Stephen Lyman for pulling this grand adventure together.

Image of the Day: Hitoyosi-City, Kumamoto, Kyushu, Japan

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Photo: Jeff Cioletti

The Drinkable Globe will present one photo from a different part of the world each day, designed to inspire you in your worldwide beverage pursuits. And if you can’t get there on a plane, you can get there in spirit with a glass. Today’s image takes us to Hitoyosi-City in the Kumamoto Prefecture, on the southern island of Kyushu. You know you’re on Kyushu when you walk into a supermarket that looks like this—entire aisles dedicated to shochu. Kyushu boasts the greatest concentration of shochu producers among all of the home islands and is, therefore, the center of the shochu universe. Kumamoto is best known for its rice shochu, while you’re most likely to find sweet potato shochu in Kagoshima and soba (buckwheat)-based shochu in Miyazaki. In others, you’ll likely discover barley, sugar cane and even sesame shochu.